In the heart of Raqqa, the impact of ISIS is all around

In the heart of Raqqa, the impact of ISIS is all around

In the heart of Raqqa, the impact of ISIS is all around

The more you get to the last ISIS base, the more obvious and more common are the sites and stories of loss and deprivation.

ISIS is about to conquer here, its fighters surrounded and under fire. But the military victory will not soon cure families separated by years of oppressive caliphate.

Furat was only 15 when ISIS took control of his hometown, Raqqa.

“My heart could not handle it. I could not handle this injustice and tyranny everywhere,” he said.

He fled and joined the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) to fight the occupiers.
Now, it’s a few miles from your old home, but your old life is gone.

He saw his family for the first time in recent years, the day before he spoke to CNN. They fled the city, while their unit was in conflict with the militants of ISIS.

He did not recognize them and could barely recognize them. He had left a child, now he was a man, a fighter.

“When I talk to them now, our conversation feels empty, there is nothing to say, I do not feel comfortable and they are not either,” he said. “When we are sure and the battle is over, we can join them again.”

For Inghazik, a commander of the self-defense forces, the house may disappear forever. Like many homeless people, she believes it is her duty to rid Syria of ISIS, Mediterranean in the Tigris.

She was born in Raqqa, but ISIS has taken over the house of her family to serve in combat positions. You can never go back.

“We are fighting for peace,” he said. “When it ended, I would like to live in a place where Kurds, Arabs, Christians, Sunnis can live together.” It was so in Raqqa.

Jagdab just 17 years tells how the body of a female fighter was recovered in Raqqa 20 days before.

He had hit a bomb and died of the impact. His legs were blown and face bloody.

US air strikes have blocked bridges prior to the Raqqa battle to reduce ISIS from the outside world and prevent the escape of its leadership on the Euphrates River.

US air strikes have blocked bridges prior to the Raqqa battle to reduce ISIS from the outside world and prevent the escape of its leadership on the Euphrates River.
She wrapped her body in a cover and carried it to the base.

It was not until the next morning that she discovered that it was her sister’s body.
She was only 20 years old.

There was time for him to pause, crying. This relentless war is not over.
In Raqqa

Driving to the front lines in one of the few armored vehicles available for the part of the SDF’s Kurdish YPG militia, soldiers play a very popular air directed against ISIS and its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

“Let’s head to Baghdadi under our feet and we will be victorious,” said the air.
The artillery surrounds the head, the ISIS positions within Raqqa orientation.

The holes were reached in the wall of 1,300 years surrounding the ancient city to open the advanced forces.

The area still controlled by ISIS seems small, but many civilians are still trapped there.

“The building fellows said they could see the civilians in the house in front of them,” said a commander named Ibo indicating a card on his tablet.

“Seven ISIS days cut off the water and all the residents who keep it before we say ISIS told them.” If you go out, we shoot him. ”

There are few signs of life on the streets. Silence woman, elderly passes through the terror in her bloodshot eyes. 50,000 additional souls are trapped behind enemy lines, as much as human shields.

Hundreds of US soldiers and marines are nearby, but stay away from journalists.

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